Overnight Camping

West Shore State Park 2

West Shore State Park

West Shore State Park

West Shore State Park

West Shore State Park is located just outside of Lakeside, MT and is open year-round!

There, you will find glacially-carved rock outcrops within the park where you’ll have incredible views of Flathead Lake and the Mission and Swan Mountains Ranges.

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Looking to hike?

All of the hiking trails at the park are single-track dirt trails that range from steep and laborious to gradual, contoured and easy-going. Pets are welcome on a leash.

West Shore has a dock so long that boats can use it year-round (including winter!) when the lake is low. Experience the tranquil atmosphere while camping in a forest of fir, pine and larch above Flathead Lake.

There are 31 campsites available with seven being tent only. If you plan to bring your RV or trailer, make sure it’s no more than 40 feet.

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    Take in the unique topography of West Shore State Park on 4 miles of hiking trails along the rocky shoreline.

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    Bring your joint state/tribal fishing license and take your shot at catching dinner from the lake!

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    Spend a day on the lake and rent a kayak or canoe from Sea Me Paddle in Lakeside or at the Park during the summer.

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    Enjoy the beach and then cool off with a dip in chilly Flathead Lake.

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    Check out the local wildlife, including great birdwatching!

West Shore has a dock so long that boats can use it year-round (including winter!) when the lake is low. Experience the tranquil atmosphere while camping in a forest of fir, pine and larch above Flathead Lake.

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Curious what other visitors have had to say about the park?

"We just stopped here to relax a bit. The park is in a nice forest with lake access. There is also a small trail inside the park which leads to a nice vista point."

"This Lake brings back so many childhood memories there is a single spot of this like that I don't love!"

"Good trails. Beautiful shore line. Camping spots look good, not too close together."

"SO pretty!!! I just want to LIVE here!"

 

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    Park

    Open Year-Round

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    Campground 

    Open May-October

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    Additional Information 

    Electricity at Campsites Until 11/1
    Potable Water Available Until 10/1

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    Location

    17768 MT Hwy 93 Lakeside, MT 59922

Wayfarers State Park 2

Wayfarers State Park

Wayfarers State Park

Wayfarers State Park

Located on the northeast shore of Flathead Lake near Bigfork, you’ll find Wayfarers State Park. This park, while small, has so much to offer!

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Looking to camp?

From spring to late fall the area abounds in wildflowers. Nature walks over the rocky shoreline to the cliffs are popular with photographers for an excellent view of Flathead Lake. There are 30 campsites in the park, including a hike-bike campsite with 9 tent pads, convenient for cyclists traveling the nearby Continental Divide route.

The maximum length for RV/trailer units is 40 feet. Starting in spring and into the late fall, Wayfarers is full of wildflowers! The best part of Wayfarers State Park? Its location along the northeastern part of Flathead Lake make it one of the ideal places to watch the sunset over the lake and sink behind the mountains.

While close enough to Bigfork to walk, the mature mixed forest of Wayfarers makes it a great place for camping and picnicking. Located near the quaint resort town of Bigfork on the northeast shore of Flathead Lake, this park is 67 acres in size and is 2,923 feet in elevation. A mature mixed forest makes this site very pleasant for camping and picnicking.

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Curious what other visitors have had to say about the park?

"Really nice park with lots of room. Nice water access very close to Bigfork. Well kept."

"Great place to camp and beautiful views of the lake!"

"Great for all ages. There were tons of families but we were able to find a whole other section with rocks to jump off of. So much fun."

"When passing through Big Fork, we often make Wayfarers our lunch stop destination. A good chance to stretch the legs, gaze out over the water, and enjoy lunch. We have camped here as well. Can be very crowded mid-summer so make a reservation. Some sites are very tight."

 

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    Park

    Day use area open year-round.

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    Campground

    Closed

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    Water and Shower House

    Available May through September.

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    Dock

    Contact park for availability.
    Dock is unusable when lake level is low.
    Typically lake level is high enough mid-June through early-September.
    For Waves & Wind Forecast, check NOAA Graphical Flathead Lake Forecast

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    Location

    8600 MT. Hwy 35 Bigfork, MT 59911

Tongue River Reservoir State Park

Tongue River Reservoir State Park

Tongue River Reservoir State Park

Tongue River Reservoir State Park is located near the southeastern border of Montana, just 10 minutes outside of Decker.

A 265-mile-long tributary of the Yellowstone River, “the Tongue” (as it is called locally) starts in Wyoming and runs through Montana.

The park features a 12-mile long reservoir set in the scenic prairie and bluff lands of southeastern Montana, which is characterized by the striking contrast of red shale and juniper canyons. Due to the rareness of large bodies of water like this in this part of the state, the park can see up to 50,000 visitors a year.

We are able to bring you valuable information about this amazing state park thanks to the support of:

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Looking to camp?

81 reservable campsites with electric hookups and 27 of those are double occupancy with two electric hook-ups. There are also 80 non-reservable, non-electric sites!

At 12 miles long, the reservoir makes for excellent fishing any time of year! You’ll find crappie, walleye, bass and northern pike here. You can also fly fish below the dam and there is a fish cleaning station located within the park.

Forgot anything or just need additional supplies? The marina at Campers Point has firewood, ice, fishing and boating supplies, boat rentals, boat and RV storage, bait, groceries, snacks, drinks, gasoline, souvenirs, fishing, and hunting licenses, and non-resident park passes.

While summertime may be the most popular time to visit the park, Tongue River Reservoir State Park also features amazing ice fishing and year-round campsites that support just that.

  • Take the boat out on the water! There are two boat ramps with docks, one at Campers Point and one at Pee Wee North.
  • Go for a swim! Sand Point has a small beach area for swimming.
  • Keep your eyes open for wildlife! You may see osprey, blue herons, deer, antelope, or bald eagles.
  • Bring your picnic! The designated day-use area has picnic tables at Campers Point and Sand Point.

Tongue River Reservoir has some of the best ice fishing in Montana.

Just ask Chris Jairell of Sheridan, WY who landed a massive 42-inch, 15-pound Tiger Muskie while ice fishing last year.

Tongue River Reservoir boasts miles and miles of ice to test your skill and get you out this winter.

You can also check The Marina's Facebook page to keep tabs on the water and weather conditions. They post regular updates as well as provide an opportunity to share your big fish stories. Just be prepared to provide photographic evidence when you do.

The Marina is also a great place to learn about what you can fish for, ice conditions, and travel tips. You can also call them at (406) 757-2225

Tongue River Reservoir State Park Currently holds two state records for the weight of fish caught, including a 37.5 pound Northern Pike?

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Curious what other visitors have had to say about the park?

"My most favorite places to go camping and fishing."

"Catch Walleye, Pike, Crappie, Bass, Cats, and MORE!"

"Great place to recreate with shore-side camping, most with electrical hookups available."

"Tongue River Reservoir has the best fishing - they have a wide variety of fish to choose from when They hit they hit you hard. Everything from walleye to catfish to a bluegill sunfish, bass, pike, crappie etc."

 

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    Park

    Open Year-Round

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    Campground

    Open Year-Round

    11 campsites have electricity year-round

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    Location

    290 Campers Point Decker, MT 59025

Painted Rocks State Park

Painted Rocks State Park

Painted Rocks State Park

Named for the green, yellow and orange lichens that cover the grey and black walls of the granite and rhyolite cliffs, Painted Rocks State Park is located in the West Fork Valley of the Bitterroot Mountains.

We are able to bring you valuable information about this amazing state park thanks to the support of:

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Looking to camp?

Painted Rocks State Park offers 25 campsites, a boat ramp and boat dock. Be sure if you’re bringing your trailer or RV that it’s no longer than 25 feet!

And if you like to hike, there are many trailheads near the park that offer access to national forest land. 

Painted Rocks Dam was originally planned to be constructed for agricultural use!

The Montana Water Conservation started work on Painted Rock Dam in 1939. Today, Painted Rocks Reservoir provides water for irrigation, stock water, domestic use and in-stream flows for fish. The reservoir the dam creates is the perfect location for boating or fishing!

While in the park, keep your eyes open for the diverse populations of wildlife including elk, mule deer, white-tailed deer, black bear or moose! You may even catch a glimpse of bighorn sheep or peregrine falcons which were reintroduced to the area in the 1980s.

Are you or do you know an avid birdwatcher? If you happen to be in the area in the spring or fall, you’re in luck! Osprey, great blue heron, water ouzels, spotted sandpiper and kill-deer make pitstops in their migration patterns at Painted Rocks State Park.

Part of the homeland of the Salish people for many years, this area continues to be a place of great value to the Salish. The area did, and still does, provide great hunting and a place to gather traditional foods such as huckleberries, serviceberries, Bitterroot, trout as well as other fish and mountain tea. 

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Curious what other visitors have had to say about the park?

"It was beautiful! I've been here many times but this is the first time I kayaked it. Absolutely smooth as glass on the most perfect sunshiny day."

"Beautiful, peaceful, wonderful place to spend time with the family."

"What is not to love. So worth the drive."

"Lovely scenery, very peaceful. Saw my first big horn sheep in the wild here. It was amazing"

 

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    Park

    Open Year-Round

    Dawn to Dusk

    Campground

    Open Year-Round

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    Location

    8809 West Fork Road Darby, MT 59829

Missouri Headwaters State Park 2

Missouri Headwaters State Park

Missouri Headwaters State Park

Missouri Headwaters State Park

Missouri Headwaters State Park is just outside of Three Forks downtown and only 35 minutes outside of Bozeman. The convergence of the Jefferson, Madison, and Gallatin rivers is the start of the longest river in North America, the Missouri River.  Considered an essential part of the geography of the western U.S.

We are able to bring you valuable information about this amazing state park thanks to the support of:

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Things to do:

Just outside of Three Forks, you’ll find Missouri Headwaters State Park, the confluence of the Madison, Jefferson and Gallatin rivers which form the 2,300 mile Missouri River.

At Missouri Headwaters State Park, you can still find the area looking much as it did historically - with much of the region's abundant wildlife, vegetation, and scenic beauty preserved - making it clear what has attracted people for thousands of years.

  • Looking to camp in history? There are 17 campsites available and you can even rent a tipi!
  • Interpretive displays describing the area’s cultural and natural history can be found to help guide you!
  • Take your bike for a spin on the many trails throughout the park!
  • Not much of a biker? Use the trails for a scenic hike instead!
  • Take a float down the river, you’ll have your choice of three!
  • Visit Fort Rock to take a look at historic pictographs. 

The three rivers that converge to form the Missouri River are named for President Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of State James Madison and Treasury Secretary Albert Gallatin!

The rich, fertile soil along with the proximity to fresh water, brought the Flathead, Bannock and Shoshone Indians to the region and later trappers and settlers, and now this beautiful land has been preserved as a state park for visitors just like you. 

Known for an abundance of wildlife, Missouri Headwaters State Park is a great place to explore, but don’t forget your bug spray! 

In addition to its vast natural resources and outdoor activities, Missouri Headwaters State Park also boasts extensive cultural history - ranging from the tribes that lived there beginning 3,000 years ago to Lewis and Clark to fur traders to settlers.

In late July 1805, William Clark and a small number from the Corps of Discovery reached the Headwaters while scouting for Shoshone Indians, whom they hoped would sell them horses. It was Sacajawea, who recognized the area as where she was captured as a child by the Hidatsa, that led the expedition successfully there.

While at the confluence, Clark left a note for Meriwether Lewis to find and later, Lewis Rock was named for him.

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Curious what other visitors have had to say about the park?

"Very interesting spot to see three rivers come together to make the start of the Missouri River."

"Great campground and great camp host! Paul is awesome and hilarious! He also recommended good fishing spots and filled us in on the local moose population, (phone pics included!) This area is spectacular for bird watching, fishing, hiking and taking in some informative L&C history. Restrooms were spotless and smelled nothing like a vault toilet. Even enjoyed a lightning storm on our last night to wrap it all up. Great entertainment! We’ll probably be back in the fall with our little retro trailer for more fishing, exploring and dry-camping."

"We made a spur of the moment trip with 5 other couples from the Bitterroot Valley . Arrived and were met by the campground host, who was not only a character, but had this park and facilities absolutely spit- shined! The "Dogs on leash" rule is strictly enforced, but makes for a more enjoyable stay for all. My two Labradors liked the Host and the camping. Highly recommend."

"Quiet evening to enjoy the view. Be sure and climb up Fort Rock and enjoy the vistas from a little higher up. Easy walk up."

 

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Medicine Rocks State Park

Medicine Rocks State Park

Medicine Rocks State Park

The Medicine Rocks are a series of natural rock formations considered sacred by local Native American tribes. They are covered in Native Rock Art or Pictographs.

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Looking to camp?

Those looking to enjoy the park overnight will find 12 campsites nestled among the Swiss cheese-like rock formations. But be sure to arrive early as all of these sites are first-come, first served.

  • Hike through the prairie and forest or even climb into caves!
  • Take incredible pictures of the rock formations!
  • Enjoy a picnic and enjoy the ever-changing landscape!
  • Keep your eyes open for wildlife including mule deer, antelope, Woodhouse's toads and sharp-tailed grouse!
  • Camp at one of the 12 rustic campsites!
  • Stargaze on a clear night or plan a visit during a meteor shower! 

A scenic drive on Montana Highway 7 through rolling hills and prairie, visitors will be amazed by the incredible beauty of Medicine Rocks State Park. As you approach the park you’ll see sandstone pillars, caves archways and towers rising out of the plains with small batches of pine forest in some areas.

But how did these formations come to be?
Around 60-million years ago, the Great Plains were covered by an immense sea. The edges of this sea were swamp-like and forested with a shallow river that cut through carrying sediment from the forming Rocky Mountains. Portions of this sediment were deposited along the path of the river creating sandbars.

Over the years, these sandbars turned to sandstone where wind, water and temperature extremes took their toll.

The stronger materials stayed while the less resistant material was eroded away. The rock that was able to withstand millions of years of erosion now makes up the odd formations found at Medicine Rocks State Park.

Once you’re in the park, a road twists and turns through rock outcroppings taking visitors to the camping and picnic areas. Many of the formations can be viewed from your vehicle, but exploring the park by foot allows visitors to get up close and personal with these rock formations.

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, Medicine Rocks is also an important cultural site for Native Americans, once used as a vision quest location, meeting place and lookout for bison or enemies.

Many early settlers and cattle drivers carved their names or initials along with the dates they visited into the rocks. You can still find many of these and a complete list of these names can be found in the nearby Carter County Museum!

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    Park

    Open Year-Round 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.

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    Campground

    Open Year-Round

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    Additional Information

    Water Available Year-Round

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    Location

    1141 Hwy 7 Ekalaka, MT

Curious what other visitors have had to say about the park?

"Really cool, has camping and places to cook out. Hiking is good. The rock formations are great."

 

"Medicine rocks state park is a beautiful and serene place to visit."

"I saw this park when I was en route to Devil's Tower and decided that, should I ever head out that way again, I would visit it. The park preserves a sand prairie with incredible sandstone. The wildlife viewing was good, as I saw several mule deer and rabbit."

"Lovely, quiet and interesting gem of a state park. We made the hour trip south off 94 and stayed near here on our way west to Yellowstone. We hiked both the loop trail and the short out and back, saw interesting flowers and wildlife. Loved it!"

 

"Lovely, quiet and interesting gem of a state park. We made the hour trip south off 94 and stayed near here on our way west to Yellowstone. We hiked both the loop trail and the short out and back, saw interesting flowers and wildlife. Loved it!"

 

"This park is a hidden gem. Very scenic and quiet and peaceful. About 7 camping spots ... my 30' trailer was just about as big as a few spots would accommodate. Clean toilets, potable water. Highly recommend."

"Lovely, quiet and interesting gem of a state park. We made the hour trip south off 94 and stayed near here on our way west to Yellowstone. We hiked both the loop trail and the short out and back, saw interesting flowers and wild life. Loved it!"

"This is an exceptional place to visit. The landscapes are gorgeous and mesmerizing. The quiet walks through the park take you back through the centuries and millennia as you explore the prairies and the sandstone towers. Highly recommend."

"A beautiful place to camp and hike. I am currently attending the Dino Shindig in Ekalaka MT, and this state park is a great addition to the memories I will make in south-eastern MT."

"An unexpected delight! Saw these beautiful rocks while driving by, made a mini detour to drive through the park. Worth the visit!"

Makoshika

Makoshika State Park

Makoshika State Park

Makoshika State Park

Makoshika State Park features spectacular badland formations and the remains of the infamous Tyrannosaurus Rex, as well as other amazing dino fossils.

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Looking to dig for fossils?

The park offers special events throughout the year, including Montana Shakespeare in the Park, Friday night campfire programs and youth programs in summer, and the famous Buzzard Day festival, the second Saturday in June, featuring 10k & 5k races and a fun run, Native American singers & drummers, jumping house, food, disc golf tournament, hikes and more!

Visitors are asked not to bring metal detectors, and no digging, collecting or removal of artifacts is allowed.

Included within the park are an archery site, scenic drives, hiking trails, 28 camping sites, a group picnic area, and an outdoor amphitheater.

The visitor center at the park entrance has interpretive exhibits that are great for kids.

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Curious what other visitors have had to say about the park?

"Really cool rock features. Very easy hikes to see amazing views."

"Never a disappointment. I LOVE Makoshika park. I always stop by to visit the ranger's in the gift shop. They are all so very welcoming."

"The scenic overlooks are awesome. Some of the trails are slightly treacherous. Bring water on your walks. The staff are friendly and helpful. The visitor center has some very cool displays of the archeological finds from the area."

"We loved this park. Great views and hiking- decent privacy for spots even though there aren’t really trees to separate the sites. Lots of things to do nearby since it’s so close to town! Wish we had time to take a longer visit and hike more of the trails! Watch out for cacti!"

 

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    Park

    Open all year
    Open daily 7 am to 10 pm Water available year round

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    Campground 

    Open year round

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    Visitor Center

    Winter Hours 3rd Monday of Sept – 3rd Thursday of May: Open Wed - Sun, 10 am - 5 pm.

    Summer Hours 3rd Friday of May – 3rd Sunday of Sept:
    Open daily, 10 am - 5 pm.

    Closed all federal and state holidays except Memorial Day, Fourth of July, and Labor Day.

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    Location

    1301 Snyder Avenue Glendive, MT 59330

Lost Creek State Park 6

Lost Creek State Park

Lost Creek State Park

Lost Creek State Park

Lost Creek State Park is a public recreation area and campground located six miles north of Anaconda, Montana, featuring limestone cliffs and multi-colored rock formations that rise 1,200 feet (370 m) above its canyon floor.

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Looking to hike?

The 502 acre state park features a short walking trail to Lost Creek Falls, which plunges 50 feet. The park is open year-round for hiking, bicycling, fishing, and wildlife viewing with mountain goats and bighorn sheep commonly seen. The park is open seasonally for camping. 

Wildlife, especially mountain goats, golden eagles, and bighorn sheep are frequently seen on the cliffs above the park.  Pika are often seen and heard in the rocks and talus of the upper portion of the canyon. 

If you prefer a longer hike, US Forest Service trails just north of the falls parking area lead for miles into the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest. One such trail winds for several miles along Lost Creek through forests and meadows with great views of the surrounding mountains.

Located in the Flint Creek Mountain Range, Lost Creek State Park is a must for Montanans and visitors alike. With the significant growth of Aspen throughout the park, the colors are brilliant come fall – so be sure to get this on your list!

Grey limestone cliffs rise high above the canyon along with towering 1,200 foot pink and white granite formations.

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Curious what other visitors have had to say about the park?

"What an awesome ticked away location! The camping looks really quite and private, tucked in the trees along the creek. Plus the small waterfall is right outside the campsite! There's a great moderate, wide trail that you can hike until you're tired. Just past the first mile you come to the first bridge which is a good turn around, but just another quarter mile is the service bridge which has a cool tiny side stream waterfall. We hiked three miles in to the old cabin and turned around there. Love the place!"

"Clean bathrooms, quiet, nice camping spots, overflow parking, hiking trails. There is a short hike to the waterfalls or you can take the longer hike and look over the falls. Beautiful area, lots of cliffs and if you bring binoculars you can watch the mountain goats traverse the cliffs. Discovery ski area, Georgetown lake, and Granite ghost town are all nearby. The sweet shop in Phillipsburg has the biggest and best candy selection in Montana but they are closed on Saturdays. If you take a left at Porters corner and go 16 miles you can spend the day searching for Sapphires at Gem Mountain."

"Very nice drive. Scenic views. The falls were very easy to walk to."

"Stopped here for a quick hike while driving thru the area. Very nice and peaceful spot, hike was easy and path was well marked. $8 entrance fee for nonresident plates, dog-friendly. I would recommend it!"

 

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Lone Pine State Park 1

Lone Pine State Park

Lone Pine State Park

Lone Pine State Park

Located just outside of the city of Kalispell to the southwest, Lone Pine State Park is home to 7.5 miles of trails for hiking, biking, snowshoeing, and horseback riding.

The park also features breathtaking scenic overlooks, where you can see Flathead Lake, Big Mountain Resort, Jewel Basin, and Glacier National Park on clear days. 

Lonepine is the second oldest State Park in Montana, dating back to February of 1941.

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Looking to camp?

The recently remodeled visitor center has a gift shop and provides visitors with highlights of the wildlife and forest ecology of the park.

A great spot for meetings or social gatherings (can host up to 100 people), the visitor center has a spacious meeting room with audio/visual capabilities and wrap around decks!

7.5 miles of trails can accommodate for short or long hikes where you’ll find great views of wildflowers in the spring and summer and local wildlife throughout the year. 

Activities

Snowshoe rentals are available for $5 per person or $10 per family during the winter months.

With adult workshops, children's activities and interpretive programs throughout the year, Lone Pine State Park is an ideal stop for field trips, out of state visitors or Montana residents interested in learning more about northwestern Montana.

Lone Pine State Park provides incredible views of the Flathead Valley, as well as year-round and wide-ranging outdoor recreation activities.
Originally owned as part of a large sheep ranch by Ernest and Hazel White, in 1941 the White’s donated the land that now makes up Lone Pine State Park, for public use and education.

The Whites stipulated that the land be developed for public use and to teach an appreciation for the benefits of conservation. Lone Pine hosts extensive educational and recreation opportunities throughout the year? From interactive talks about birds of prey, backcountry horse and mule packing, to a bat box building workshop, Lone Pine has an event to interest everyone. 

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Curious what other visitors have had to say about the park?

"This a great little recreation spot. There's hiking, multiple viewing spots, a visitor center, picnic and volleyball area. Additionally one the coolest things they got there is an archery range/course. As a bow hunter I go there often!"

"Great for either short or longer hikes. Very friendly staff. Great views."

"It's very breath taking!! Enjoy the little hike I take with my brother every time I come to Montana!!"

"A great place to go for short or long hikes. Amazing views over the valley. The level of difficulty is very low on most trails, and they are all connected and easy to navigate with clearly marked signs. Will most definitely be returning for more hiking adventures with the kiddos."

 

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    Park

    Open all year
    Sunrise to sunset

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    Visitor Center

    Opens June 6, 2020
    Wednesday through Saturday 10am – 5pm.
    Sunday 12:30pm to 5pm.
    Closed Monday & Tuesday.
    Closed November 26, 27, December 24, 25, 31, January 1

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    Archery Trail

    Open for the 2020 season.

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    Location

    300 Lone Pine Rd. Kalispell, MT 59901

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Logan State Park

Logan State Park

Logan State Park

Just off Highway 2 between Libby and Kalispell, you’ll find Logan State Park, a local hotspot. 

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Looking to camp?

Logan has 37 campsites, but no tent-only sites. RVs and trailers are more than welcome as long as they are no longer than 40 feet. The RV dump station closes in early October.
You’ll even find a playset for the kids and a short nature trail here.

  • Take a dip in the lake and go swimming
  • Go for a boat ride and find some peace.
  • You and your friends or family can even play a game of horseshoes!
  • Take a chance and go water skiing!
  • More of a fisher? You’ll find loads of salmon, trout, perch, pike, bass!
  • 17 Acres

Located in the middle of the 3,000-acre Thompson Chain of Lakes, Logan is heavily forested with Western Larch, Douglas-Fir and Ponderosa Pine making for a beautiful view of the tree covered, mountainous area.

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Curious what other visitors have had to say about the park?

"Very clean great price, camp host very friendly and knowledgeable about everything."

"We camp host here. The people are fantastic. The campground is clean,quiet and right on a beautiful lake with great fishing. All sites have electric. There is water, showers and dump station available on site. Boat slips are available and there is a paved boat launch ramp. There is a playground for the kids and a grassy beach area for swimming. Great place to camp."

"Great park highly recommended. The gate attendants are great and friendly also."

"We absolutely enjoyed our stay. The camp hosts and anyone who worked at the campground were stellar. They wanted you to enjoy your stay. Fishing excellent. Thank you. Only change I'd want is not paying for showers or if you did pay it not be limited to 6 minutes."

 

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  • pine icon

    Park

    Open Year-Round

    7 a.m. to 10 p.m.

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    Campground

    Open Year-Round

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    Additional Information

    Water & Showers Available

    Until September 30

    Boat Slips Available:

    Mid-May to September 30

     

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    Location

    77518 US HWY 2 Libby, MT 59923